The Talker: Kids` allergies identified on `Don`t Feed Me` shirts - New York News

The Talker: Kids` allergies identified on `Don`t Feed Me` T-shirts

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Credit: kymwhitley.org Credit: kymwhitley.org
CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

When young children have food allergies, it's a constant worry for the parents. You want you them to be like every other kid--go to pre-school, birthday parties, and play dates--but the consequences of a mistake or misunderstanding can be very serious.

So if you were one of those parents, would you put your little one in a shirt to identify his/her allergies? In big letters, the shirt reads: "don't feed me..." then it lists the most common kids' allergies for parents to check off. That way, everyone who sees the child knows exactly what foods to avoid giving the child.

The shirt was developed by the actress, comedian, and reality TV star Kym Whitley. Her two-year-old son, Joshua, is a model for the shirts. Joshua, who is allergic to peanuts, chicken, corn, eggs, and peaches among other things, was once accidentally fed peanut butter by a nanny.

Whitley originally made the shirts just for Joshua, but after other parents saw them and wanted some too, she started selling them. The proceeds from the sale of the $10 shirts go towards Joshua's college fund, the site says. Whitley says once, at a party, the shirt stopped someone who was about to give Joshua egg salad.

It's tough to argue with that result, but still, one doctor who's an expert in food allergies said he has mixed feelings about the shirt. He said it could become a magnet for bullies, but also added it might be a good idea at places like day camps, where workers might not be professionals.

For more information or to purchase a shirt, visit Kym Whitley's website.

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