Cab company helps pregnant teens finish school - New York News

Cab company helps pregnant teens finish school

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PHOENIX -

It may seem glamorous on shows like "Teen Mom," but being a young mother is tough. A non-profit that helps teen moms graduate from high school and prepare them for work is teaming up with a local cab company to help make moving around the valley a little easier.

The cab company calls it "Drive To Success." Clean Air Cabs takes the teens to job interviews and to get professional clothing. Many of these teens don't have transportation, and it's tough.

"Especially when you are trying to find that area for your own success, it's very hard to get around, you are bogged down with a lot of responsibilities. Trying to make it an easier choice," says Steve Lopez of Clean Air Cab.

These girls can use the help. They are teen moms -- many are kids themselves. They are at Child and Family Resources to help them be better moms and get a job.

"All of our clients are between 16 and 21 and are pregnant or parenting right now," says Joy Leveen from Child and Family Resources.

They must finish their GED so they can work and they must learn how to parent. These young moms are working on the GED in the classroom, which is adjacent to where their children are being cared for, so they don't have to worry about them.

The program, known as the Maricopa Center for Adolescent Parents, has saved hundreds of teen moms.

"I have just one test left, so that's over with I will go through the job interview and everything. They help you update resume and everything," says teen mom Brianna Markel.

That free cab ride will come in handy. The free cab ride is for teens graduating and now looking for jobs.

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