New Study Suggests Preschoolers Learning More Than We Realize - New York News

New Study Suggests Preschoolers Learning More Than We Realize

Posted: Updated:
MIDDLETOWN TOWNSHIP, Pa. -

Are you a "helicopter" parent? Do you hover over your pre-schooler with flash cards, hoping to make him or her smarter? A new study shows you may not have to-- little Johnny and Janey are soaking up a whole lot more than we realize.

Ariana is about to turn three, old enough to know what a chair is. But any adult will tell you that at her young age, there's still plenty of words she doesn't know. So when Dr. Jennifer Zosh showed her two images side by side, how did Ariana know to pick out a thing called a "pizer?" "Kids are amazing at learning," Dr. Zosh explained. "And I think sometimes we don't give them enough credit. Sometimes we think we need to tell kids everything."

Dr. Zosh is a developmental psychologist at Penn State Brandywine, who is studying how kids learn. In one experiment, she showed young kids two objects, one they'd recognize, and one they'd never heard of. She makes up names for those objects, to ensure it's a new word they won't recognize. Three-year-old Madeline picked out something Dr. Zosh called a "tanzer." But how'd she do it? "Kids, especially when they hit about three years old or so, they now have enough knowledge about the world to be able to use that to figure things out for themselves," Dr. Zosh told Fox 29.

When we watched Madeline pick out the tanzer, her finger hovered over the object she recognized. But because she never heard the word "tanzer" before, she figured out it must be the other object. "I'm amazed actually at some of the things I guess I didn't realize that she knew... or the kind of process of elimination," Madeline's mom Anamarie Jones-Blisard said.

What's more, Dr. Zosh's research shows that when kids do figure it out for themselves, they're more likely to remember the word. "It's better for them to use this process than if I were to just show them this and say, this is a glark," Dr. Zosh said. "See, this is a glark. If they are asked to figure it out for themselves, they show better memory."

So want do we parents need to learn? "Kind of realize that there is a lot that they can do at such a young age, that maybe we weren't aware of," Jones-Blisard advised.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • 8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    Friday, April 18 2014 8:26 AM EDT2014-04-18 12:26:31 GMT
    Officials are investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at New Jersey's Stevens Institute of Technology.The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine.
    The New Jersey Department of Health is investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at Stevens Institute of Technology.  The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine. Symptoms include swollen salivary glands, fever, headache, tiredness and loss of appetite.



  • Search for woman who tried to snatch baby in stroller

    NYPD: Woman tried to snatch baby in stroller

    Friday, April 18 2014 7:37 AM EDT2014-04-18 11:37:43 GMT
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
  • Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:48 PM EDT2014-04-18 02:48:47 GMT
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices