TREVINO CASE: Missing woman's car recently had brake lines cut - New York News

TREVINO CASE: Missing woman's car recently had brake lines cut

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BLOOMINGTON, Minn. (KMSP) -

The disappearance of 30-year-old Kira Trevino is getting national and international attention, but there's still no sign of her -- and the clock is ticking for prosecutors to either charge her husband or let him go.

Investigators say there's still no sign of the store manager who worked at the Mall of America, and prosecutors must either charge 37-year-old Jeffrey Trevino by 10 a.m. on Thursday or release him unless an extension is granted.

Jeffrey Trevino remains in custody at the Ramsey County Jail. He was booked on suspicion of murder one day after his wife's car was discovered in a ramp at the mall with her purse and cell phone inside.

Mall security found Kira Trevino's white Chevy Cobalt in a remote part of the parking ramp early Sunday morning -- the same care a friend told FOX 9 he worked on recently because she'd had a flat tire, a cut brake line and cut transmission line within the last month.

Once he learned Kira Trevino was missing, that friend said he worried someone may have been stalking her or sabotaging her car.

Kira Trevino's coworkers at Delia's are coping with a strange set of circumstances, but they're still holding out hope.

"It just hasn't fully hit me yet," said Jackie Arradondo, who wears the missing-person flier on her sweatshirt. "I'm still hopeful we're going to find her."

Arradondo said she sees reminders of her friend everywhere she looks.

"It's weird coming to the mall, especially with my employment history with her," she said. "I'm used to seeing her face and to come in to work and turn the corner looking for her, and she's not there. It tears you down a little every day."

Arradondo worked at Delia's with Kira Trevino, and at Wet Seal before that. She said the last time she talked to Kira Trevino was on Thursday, when she got a call asking her to come in to work. The next day, Kira Trevino disappeared.

"I got a phone call when she didn't show up for work from a different manager at the store asking if I had talked to her," Arradondo recalled. "Then, I knew something was wrong because that's not like her."

Arradondo said her co-worker never mentioned any car problems to her because the she was too busy planning a dream trip to Mexico or Costa Rica, where Kira Trevino married her husband three years ago.

Now, she wonders if she'll ever see her friend again.

"You never really know how much someone means to you until you can't have them anymore," she said.

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