Sober living director beaten with bat during armed robbery - New York News

Sober living director beaten with bat during armed robbery

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Martin Robert Dominguez Martin Robert Dominguez
GILBERT, Ariz. -

Police say the director of Changes Sober Living Facility was left bound and bleeding for almost 12 hours before he was found by his business partner, who went to his home when he missed an appointment.

"I thought he was dead," said Jim Nash, general manager at Changes Sober Living.

Blue cleaning fluid, used to remove blood from 58-year old Bob Schultz' Gilbert garage, reveals a violent attack.

Photos show blood spattered throughout the home.

Nash, Schultz's business partner, found him badly beaten and tied up in the living room.

"He told me somebody was waiting for him when he got home," said Nash.

Schultz told police the suspect beat him in his garage with an aluminum baseball bat, tied his hands with an electrical chord, rope and packing tape and then led him through the house searching for money.

"This was a setup," said Nash.

Police say the suspect, 46-year old Martin Robert Dominguez, stole $6,000 from Schultz, the director of Changes Sober Living Facility.

Neither Nash or Schultz knows the suspect, but they think someone told him Schultz would have money on him.

"This is a cash business mostly and every Friday we collect rent monies from the nine different houses we have in Mesa," said Nash.

Schultz'S wife, who was out of town, returned to his bedside.

"I didn't recognize him, he looks so bad," said Niclia Schultz.

Doctors say Schultz has multiple skull and facial fractures, brain hemorrhaging and kidney failure.

"He is absolutely lucky to be alive," said Nash.

Dominguez is facing kidnapping and armed robbery charges.

Police say they found a baseball bat and bloody clothes in his home.

No word on if more arrests will be made.

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