Lawmakers react to Detroit financial report along party lines - New York News

State lawmakers react to Detroit financial report along party lines

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Senator Coleman Young, Junior said he is "disappointed," "devastated" and "angry."  (Credit: Fox 2 News) Senator Coleman Young, Junior said he is "disappointed," "devastated" and "angry." (Credit: Fox 2 News)
LANSING, Mich. (WJBK) -

The report on the financial condition of Detroit among legislative Democrats went over like the proverbial lead balloon.

"I'm beyond disappointed.  I'm devastated.  I'm angry.  I'm a mix of emotions right now," said Senator Coleman Young, Junior.

But among Republicans, the reports' conclusion that the city has no satisfactory plan to resolve its financial problems brought this response from Senator Rick Jones.

"This is their last chance to save the city.  In my opinion, when you're billions of dollars in the hole and you don't have any money coming in, you're either going to go bankrupt and dissolve or you're going to have to get this emergency manager," he said.

Ironically while lawmakers were sifting the implications of this financial report, researchers were going over some statewide polling data suggesting that struggling cities is a low priority with Michigan residents.  In fact, more residents are concerned about protecting the Great Lakes and helping small business than they are worried about helping Detroit and other struggling cities.  Why?

"There's been enough concern and anxiety over is Detroit organized to succeed, corruption with Kwame Kilpatrick.  You do, unfortunately, see this can we help Detroit given the dysfunction that you've seen in a Detroit?" said researcher John Austin.

The governor is expected to make a decision on the EM within a week or two.  Meanwhile, Senator Morris Hood III, a Democrat, wants a partnership with the state, not a bulldozer coming in.

"As a bulldozer effect or just coming in and forcing your way in instead of partnershipping up and coming in and helping, and I think that's one of the push backs that you're going to have.  It doesn't seem as though you're coming in to help.  It's coming in to take over," he said.

Lieutenant Governor Brian Alley said the EM has worked in Pontiac and Flint, and a good working relationship to make it work in Detroit, he concedes that remains a work in progress.

"We're still working on really creating the environment for success in Detroit.  It has been harder.  It's taken a longer period of time in order to make that happen," he said.

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