NASA: Russian Meteor Unrelated to Asteroid Flyby - New York News

NASA: Russian Meteor Unrelated to Asteroid Flyby

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Asteroid 2012 DA14 – Earth Flyby Reality Check
02.15.13
 

Editor's Note: NASA statement on Russian meteor:
"According to NASA scientists, the trajectory of the Russian meteorite was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, making it a completely unrelated object. Information is still being collected about the Russian meteorite and analysis is preliminary at this point. In videos of the meteor, it is seen to pass from left to right in front of the rising sun, which means it was traveling from north to south. Asteroid DA14's trajectory is in the opposite direction, from south to north."
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Update Feb. 15, 2013

Asteroid 2012 DA14

› Complete Asteroid Flyby Coverage

NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office can accurately predict the path of the small near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14. There is no chance that the asteroid might be on a collision course with Earth.

This small near-Earth asteroid is passing very close to Earth on February 15, so close that it will pass inside the ring of geosynchronous weather and communications satellites. The flyby will provide a unique opportunity for researchers to study a near-Earth object up close.

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