Bill would bar turned-in guns from being destroyed - New York News

Bill would bar turned-in guns from being destroyed

Posted: Updated:
  • Gun Control Across AmericaMore>>

  • Study: Murder rate drops as concealed carry rises

    Study: Murder rate drops as concealed carry rises

    A dramatic spike in the number of Americans with permits to carry concealed weapons coincides with an equally stark drop in violent crime, according to a new study, which Second Amendment advocates say makes the case that more guns can mean safer streets.
    A dramatic spike in the number of Americans with permits to carry concealed weapons coincides with an equally stark drop in violent crime, according to a new study, which Second Amendment advocates say makes the case that more guns can mean safer streets.
  • Target asks customers to leave firearms at home

    Target asks customers to leave firearms at home

    Target is "respectfully" asking its customers to not bring firearms into its stores, even where it is allowed by law. In a statement, interim CEO John Mulligan said Target wants a "safe and inviting" atmosphere for its shoppers and employees.
    Target is "respectfully" asking its customers to not bring firearms into its stores, even where it is allowed by law. In a statement, interim CEO John Mulligan said Target wants a "safe and inviting" atmosphere for its shoppers and employees.
  • NRA calls 'open carry' rallies 'downright weird'

    NRA calls 'open carry' rallies 'downright weird'

    Companies, customers and others critical of gun rights advocates who have brought military-style assault rifles into businesses as part of demonstrations supporting "open carry" gun rights now have a surprising ally: the National Rifle Association.
    Companies, customers and others critical of gun rights advocates who have brought military-style assault rifles into businesses as part of demonstrations supporting "open carry" gun rights now have a surprising ally: the National Rifle Association.
PHOENIX -

What do you do with guns surrendered in those weapons buyback programs? Should they be destroyed? Or should they be sold?

A new bill that just passed out of an Arizona House committee Wednesday would change state law -- preventing police agencies from destroying weapons.

At issue is what to do with guns taken in from weapons buyback programs. State Representative Justin Pierce says, under the law, police agencies are supposed to sell them to licensed dealers.

But because of a loophole in the law local municipalities have been deciding for themselves what to do with them -- and some are choosing to destroy them.

"We don't want you taking in the guns this way, we don't want municipalities to engage in a quote on quote buyback program, purchase these firearms for the sole purchase of destroying them," says Arizona Rep. Justin Pierce, Republican.

Pierce says it's not the state's responsibility if someone wants to get rid of a gun.

"It's their property, they can do what they wish, if they want to take measures to destroy the firearm they are within their liberties to do that."

"What's the difference? We represent the people. The people are asking for assistance, no one knows what to do with a gun, how do you destroy it? Throw it in the garbage? What do you do?" counters Maricopa County Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox.

Mary Rose Wilcox, a victim of gun violence herself, says the language of the new bill is just a way to get rid of gun buyback programs altogether.

"We had an older man come in with his son, put an AK-47 on the table. There's no questions asked. We don't ask how they got it, why they want to get rid of it. We take that gun. In their wildest imagination would never think we would recirculate it back to the public to sell it," says Wilcox.

"It's not against the second amendment, it's not against the right to carry arms, it's an avenue and tool for law enforcement to say, we will help you get rid of that gun."

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Superstorm Sandy

    Grimm criticizes storm recovery program

    Grimm criticizes storm recovery program

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 11:12 PM EDT2014-08-28 03:12:14 GMT
    When Superstorm Sandy destroyed Maureen Childs' Staten Island home, she turned to New York City's Build it Back program for help. She says what she got back was heartache. At a news conference Wednesday, Rep. Michael Grimm, who represents Staten Island and part of Brooklyn, highlighted what he called failures in a program designed to help victims of Sandy get back on their feet.
    When Superstorm Sandy destroyed Maureen Childs' Staten Island home, she turned to New York City's Build it Back program for help. She says what she got back was heartache. At a news conference Wednesday, Rep. Michael Grimm, who represents Staten Island and part of Brooklyn, highlighted what he called failures in a program designed to help victims of Sandy get back on their feet.
  • Pranna to end 'boozy brunch' after viral video

    Pranna to end 'boozy brunch' after viral video

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 11:10 PM EDT2014-08-28 03:10:44 GMT
    Video posted on YouTube showing young women and men who appear to be stumbling and drunk coming out of the restaurant Pranna in the flatiron district is why angry residents packed into a community meeting to complain Wednesday night. Neighbors say problems have been happening on Saturdays and Sundays during a so-called bottomless brunch, where patrons can drink as many drinks as they want in a two-hour period.
    Video posted on YouTube showing young women and men who appear to be stumbling and drunk coming out of the restaurant Pranna in the flatiron district is why angry residents packed into a community meeting to complain Wednesday night. Neighbors say problems have been happening on Saturdays and Sundays during a so-called bottomless brunch, where patrons can drink as many drinks as they want in a two-hour period.
  • NYC's secret access for celebrities

    NYC's secret access for celebrities

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 11:07 PM EDT2014-08-28 03:07:59 GMT
    A little bit of money, power and fame can unlock a whole world of hidden passageways and detours allowing stars to come and go discreetly. Seth Weisser has perfected private shopping inside his Soho vintage boutique What Goes Around Comes Around. Celebs slip in through the side door and descend into the vault. But the upper floor isn't too shabby either, featuring hundreds of rare Chanel and Hermes handbags.
    A little bit of money, power and fame can unlock a whole world of hidden passageways and detours allowing stars to come and go discreetly. Seth Weisser has perfected private shopping inside his Soho vintage boutique What Goes Around Comes Around. Celebs slip in through the side door and descend into the vault. But the upper floor isn't too shabby either, featuring hundreds of rare Chanel and Hermes handbags.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices