Dispatcher walks caller through CPR, child saved - New York News

Dispatcher walks caller through CPR, child saved

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PHOENIX -

Dispatcher: "Place the child flat on his back on a hard surface."

Mom: "Yes."

Dispatcher: "With the heel of your hand in the center of his chest push down hard and fast."

[Child crying]

Dispatcher: "He's crying, that's a very good sign."

Mom: "Thank you so much! They're here, I got him breathing. I got him breathing."

It's a situation that would test the mettle of any parent.

A 3-year old found blue and seizing, running a 104 degree fever.

Thankfully, the 911 dispatcher on the other line that day had been through a special program and was trained to calmly walk mom through CPR. The dispatcher honed those skills after going through a statewide CPR academy.

It's hard to believe that just five days ago Bryce Hicks almost lost his life just a month and a half before his third birthday.

He had the flu and a high fever and stopped breathing while in his bed. His parents heard some noises and found him in bad shape.

"He was seizing on his bed -- he was already blue," says mom Dori Hicks.

Dori Hicks frantically called 911. The dispatcher calmed her down and told her how to perform CPR on her son.

"The 911 operator guided me through the whole thing -- and by the second time with me trying with the 911 operator -- we got him back breathing."

David Lukas was the Rural Metro dispatcher on the other end. Like all dispatchers in Arizona -- he's been specially trained to talk people through giving CPR.

"It's absolutely rewarding to be able to help the public and especially when you hear something like this where a young boy walks out of the hospital healthy and happy," says Lukas.

"Every minute without CPR your chance of survival goes down by about 7 to 10 percent," says Dr. Ben Bobrow, AZ Dept. of Health Services.

Dr. Ben Bobrow says the state program has saved over 1,000 lives since it was started in 2004.

"The only way to do CPR wrong is to not do CPR. They can't mess it up. If they do nothing that person is almost for sure going to die," says Dr. Bobrow.

"I don't think without the resuscitation he would have come out of it. He would have ending up dying -- passing in his bed there," says Hicks.

Bryce has no lingering symptoms from that scary situation. His family is having someone come to their home this weekend to teach CPR to other family members, including Bryce's 8-year-old brother.

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