Family sues Disneyland over racist 'Rabbit' - New York News

Family sues Disneyland over racist 'Rabbit'

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SAN DIEGO -

It's a memorable part of parenthood -- when your child gets to meet their favorite character at an amusement park. But a family in San Diego says they were robbed of that special moment because a Disneyland employee was racist.

This family has been battling with Disney since last August because they say the amusement park employee was racist -- and now they just want to make sure no other children go through this.

"I was going to hug him but he turned his back," said 6-year-old Jason Black.

"How'd that make you feel?"

"Sad," replied Jason.

The 6-year-old was shunned by his favorite character from Alice in Wonderland. All he wanted was a hug -- and his older brother Elijah just wanted to hold the rabbit's hand.

"The rabbit was turning his back on him like he didn't event want to touch him, I went up to try to hold his hand but he kept on flicking my hand off," said Elijah.

"Our first instinct was okay, maybe they have new policies, maybe they aren't supposed to touch the kids anymore so then we stood by and we watched," said father Jason Black Sr.

What they saw led them to believe that the person playing Rabbit was racist.

"This white boy. He started hugging on the little girl and kissing... then hugging the boy and they were white," said Elijah Black.

"There were two other kids that came up and the rabbit showered them, hugged kissed them, posed with them, meanwhile that made my kids feel horrible," said Black Sr.

The family immediately showed the photos to management and filed a complaint. Management offered VIP passes -- but the family turn down that offer, asking for an apology and termination of the employee instead.

"It's about the principle and what are you going to do to make the situation better so this doesn't happen to another family."

After months of battling with Disney, the family has been asked to sign a confidential waiver in exchange for $500. They hired an attorney and now demand that the company look at surveillance video of the interaction.

Disney has not yet responded to the family's request. Our affiliate in San Diego contacted Disney for comment and they emailed a statement saying "We cannot comment on something that we are not aware of -- and that we carefully review all guest claims."

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