Family sues Disneyland over racist 'Rabbit' - New York News

Family sues Disneyland over racist 'Rabbit'

Posted: Updated:
SAN DIEGO -

It's a memorable part of parenthood -- when your child gets to meet their favorite character at an amusement park. But a family in San Diego says they were robbed of that special moment because a Disneyland employee was racist.

This family has been battling with Disney since last August because they say the amusement park employee was racist -- and now they just want to make sure no other children go through this.

"I was going to hug him but he turned his back," said 6-year-old Jason Black.

"How'd that make you feel?"

"Sad," replied Jason.

The 6-year-old was shunned by his favorite character from Alice in Wonderland. All he wanted was a hug -- and his older brother Elijah just wanted to hold the rabbit's hand.

"The rabbit was turning his back on him like he didn't event want to touch him, I went up to try to hold his hand but he kept on flicking my hand off," said Elijah.

"Our first instinct was okay, maybe they have new policies, maybe they aren't supposed to touch the kids anymore so then we stood by and we watched," said father Jason Black Sr.

What they saw led them to believe that the person playing Rabbit was racist.

"This white boy. He started hugging on the little girl and kissing... then hugging the boy and they were white," said Elijah Black.

"There were two other kids that came up and the rabbit showered them, hugged kissed them, posed with them, meanwhile that made my kids feel horrible," said Black Sr.

The family immediately showed the photos to management and filed a complaint. Management offered VIP passes -- but the family turn down that offer, asking for an apology and termination of the employee instead.

"It's about the principle and what are you going to do to make the situation better so this doesn't happen to another family."

After months of battling with Disney, the family has been asked to sign a confidential waiver in exchange for $500. They hired an attorney and now demand that the company look at surveillance video of the interaction.

Disney has not yet responded to the family's request. Our affiliate in San Diego contacted Disney for comment and they emailed a statement saying "We cannot comment on something that we are not aware of -- and that we carefully review all guest claims."

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Friday, August 22 2014 8:00 AM EDT2014-08-22 12:00:26 GMT
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
  • 17,000 red light camera tickets dismissed

    17,000 red light camera tickets dismissed

    Friday, August 22 2014 7:39 AM EDT2014-08-22 11:39:23 GMT
    A technical glitch in a red light camera operating system means that some 17,000 motorists in New Jersey will not have to pay a fine for running red lights. Computer problems between May 28 and June 30 resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations. New Jersey law requires that if a ticket hasn't been served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
    A technical glitch in a red light camera operating system means that some 17,000 motorists in New Jersey will not have to pay a fine for running red lights. Computer problems between May 28 and June 30 resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations. New Jersey law requires that if a ticket hasn't been served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
  • Brooklyn Bridge flags back on US soil

    Brooklyn Bridge flags back on US soil

    Friday, August 22 2014 7:25 AM EDT2014-08-22 11:25:55 GMT
    Police say the two American flags swiped from the Brooklyn Bridge and replaced with faded white ones are back on U.S. soil. NYPD spokesman Sgt. Carlos Nieves said Friday that the flags are in the United States. He did not know their exact location. Two German artists claimed responsibility earlier this month for the July 22 stunt. 
    Police say the two American flags swiped from the Brooklyn Bridge and replaced with faded white ones are back on U.S. soil. NYPD spokesman Sgt. Carlos Nieves said Friday that the flags are in the United States. He did not know their exact location. Two German artists claimed responsibility earlier this month for the July 22 stunt. 
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices