The Talker: Is America obsessed with appearances? - New York News

The Talker: Is America obsessed with appearances?

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

How do we form opinions about people? Is it on their overall merits or is it mostly about looks?

Politicians, perhaps more than anyone, are judged superficially--which might explain New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's performance last night on the David Letterman Show.

Christie is considered a contender to run for president in a few years, but his weight is considered a potential obstacle to victory.

Christie's physique is a running gag on the Letterman Show. They've doctored-up news footage to make it look like he's eating or cooking.

Christie's PR strategy was to embrace the joke and play along.

"I've made jokes about you not just one or two not just ongoing here or there intermittent but (takes out doughnut and eats it) I didn't know this was gonna be this long," Christie said on Letterman.

About how he's ultimately judged, Christie said if you do something well, people will give you a fair opportunity to do it.

Being the first lady takes a thick skin. Even when you're beautiful and near-perfectly toned like Michelle Obama, your looks get criticized.

In Alabama, a high school football coach who also teaches psychology was caught on tape telling a class of students the first lady has a, "fat butt."

He also went on a bigoted rant against people who are gay.

He was suspended ten days without pay and won't teach psychology anymore, but he'll get to keep his coaching job.

Whatdetermines how people are judged by others? Isit their overall merits -- personality, intelligence, looks, how they presentthemselves, etc? Or is it mostly just looks? Tellus what you think on our Facebook page.

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