Can $5B make Rochester a fun place to live? - New York News

Can $5B make Rochester a fun place to live?

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ROCHESTER, Minn. (KMSP) -

The world-renowned Mayo Clinic draws patients from 130 countries, and it's a trend they hope will continue as they invest billions in expanding their campus -- but they want Rochester to expand too.

With the $5-billion investment announced, one of the hopes is that a more vibrant city will give people another reason to visit Rochester.

"We get the clientele that come here from around the world on their Lear jet and say, 'Where's the 5-star hotel,' or , 'Where's the upscale restaurants?'" said Mayor Ardell Brede.

Those in the hospitality business -- like Todd Jensen, with the Loop Bar and Restaurant -- know that area attractions are a must to keep people coming to town.

"We need vibrant bars," he said.

The world-famous clinic is hoping that its $3-billion investment will attract another $2.5 billion to help transform the city where it is headquartered, creating a cultural destination that creates jobs in the process.

"We do need to attract some different talent to keep Mayo at the top of its game," said Deana Chup.

Mayo Clinic is also asking lawmakers to consider $585 million in improved infrastructure development, money that would be paid back through a share of increased revenues as the local economy expands.

"We're not looking for a handout or up-front money from the state," said Dr. John Noseworthy, CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We're seeking an infusion of state dollars on the proof -- not the promise -- of investment."

Mayo Clinic's impact on the state is already estimated at $10 billion annually.

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