Veteran GPB producer resigns, cites hiring of Chip Rogers - New York News

Veteran GPB producer resigns, cites hiring of Chip Rogers

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ATLANTA -

A veteran Georgia Public Broadcasting employee has resigned, citing the hiring of former powerful state lawmaker Chip Rogers.

Rogers resigned his state Senate seat last month and is now working as an executive producer at GPB with a six-figure salary.

"I have been presented with a great opportunity with the governor and Georgia Public Broadcasting to take a leadership role in that organization," Rogers said in December.

Rogers became executive producer for GPB's community jobs program.    

After learning that the former Senate Majority leader will be paid $150,000 annually, GPB senior producer Ashlie Wilson Pendley has resigned.
 
 A copy of her resignation letter refers to GPB cutbacks, saying, in part, "I think it is unconscionable to create a position and compensate any individual in this manner during these difficult times"

The letter also says, "This was the wrong decision for GPB. It has the appearance of the political manipulation of the public airwaves. This stinks of cronyism."

Bryan Long of the advocacy group Better Georgia released the letter.

"She, in her well-worded resignation letter, just expressed what a lot of people are feeling," said Long.

His group has been critical of Gov. Nathan Deal and other Republicans.
    
"This job, which, you know, Chip Rogers has been given without any competition, he didn't compete for it, it wasn't advertised -- it's wrong," said Long.

FOX 5 left phone messages but did not get a response from the newly-resigned producer.

The Governor's Office and GPB declined comment as well, except for a GPB official who said Pendley had made "amazing contributions."

Pendley had been a GPB employee for 15 years.

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