Emanuel gives insight to gun control in D.C., makes plans - New York News

Emanuel gives insight to gun control in D.C., makes plans for Chicago

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

A fatal gas station shooting involving a man found near the Eisenhower Expressway comes as Mayor Emanuel goes to Washington to push for gun control measures.

SEE: Man found fatally shot inside van near Eisenhower Expressway

Mayor Rahm Emanuel has ordered an analysis of Chicago's city employee pension funds to see if they hold companies that make or sell assault weapons. If so, he wants them sold.

Emanuel spoke on Monday in Washington about his support for new gun control measures. He participated in a panel with the Center for American Progress Action Fund to talk about his role in getting the Assault Weapons Ban passed in 1994, when he was senior adviser to President Clinton.

The mayor spoke on the political lessons learned during the passage of that bill and how the dialogue in Washington D.C. needs to shift in order to enact legislation to reduce gun violence.

He says legislation should focus on limiting criminal access to guns. Separately his office announced that Emanuel ordered the pension fund analysis as a "first step" in removing the companies from city investment plans.

The mayor said the city shouldn't invest in companies that "profit from the proliferation of assault weapons." The five city funds are worth more than $13.5 billion.

Emanuel said last week that he is working on a gun control ordinance for the city after an assault weapons ban stalled in the Illinois General Assembly. He is expected to introduce that ordinance at the next City Council meeting. It will include a call on city pensions and retirement fund managers to review their portfolio of investments and eliminate companies that make or sell assault weapons.

Alderman Bob Fioretti (2nd) joined Good Day Chicago to speak on the chances of something like this passed.

"Obviously we are very restricted in terms of the rights that we look at gun ownership in the city. Obviously it will pass, but the question gets to be the practical implications of it," Fioretti said. "If we're serious about going after it, by extending the time to allow six months in jail for illegal gun control, illegal ownership or illegal having a hands gun, most times they look at the police will get prosecuting them understand a felony. The city charges get thrown out.

"I would rather see a substantive type of change rather than cosmetic," Fioretti continued. "As we look at the 506 deaths last year, most have been by illegal handguns. We have to protect the constitution but we have to protect our citizens. It's very tough in terms of how many deaths we have had in this city."

At the same time the mayor spoke on the one-month anniversary of the massacre in Newtown, just a few blocks away, President Obama also talked about  banning military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines of bullets and requiring background checks on all gun purchasers.

"Will all of them get through this Congress? I don't know," the president said. "But what's uppermost in my mind is making sure that I'm honest with the American people and with members of Congress about what I think will work." 

A month after the mass murder of youngsters in Connecticut, opponents of new gun controls were pushing back. A freshman representative from Texas declared that, if the President used his executive power to impose new gun rules, he would move to impeach him. At a White House news conference, the President spoke of persuading Congress to enact new gun laws.

"I think we can do that in a sensible way that comports with the Second Amendment," Obama said. "And then Members of Congress are going to have to have a debate and examine their own conscience."

After failing to win new gun controls in Springfield last week, the mayor told a panel discussion in Washington that the President's proposals may face an even harder time on Capitol Hill. But he said federal regulations would work better, noting that, despite Chicago's anti-gun laws, police seized 7,900 firearms last year.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Alderman Bob Fioretti (2nd) joined Good Day Chicago to speak on the chances of something like this passed.

 

"Obviously we are very restricted in terms of the rights that we look at gun ownership in the city. Obviously it will pass, but the question gets to be the practical implications of it," Fioretti said. "If we're serious about going after it, by extending the time to allow six months in jail for illegal gun control, illegal ownership or illegal having a hands gun, most times they look at the police will get prosecuting them understand a felony. The city charges get thrown out.

 

"I would rather see a substantive type of change rather than cosmetic," Fioretti continued. "As we look at the 506 deaths last year, most have been by illegal handguns. We have to protect the constitution but we have to protect our citizens. It's very tough in terms of how many deaths we have had in this city."

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