Shot first, stabbed second or vice versa a key question - New York News

Shot first, stabbed second or vice versa a key question in Arias trial

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PHOENIX -

She may look small and harmless, but detectives and prosecutors are painting Jodi Arias as a cold-blooded killer who deserves the death penalty for not only stabbing her boyfriend -- but shooting him after he was already dead.

The crime scene can be compared to a Quentin Tarantino movie -- a lot of blood spilled in both. The difference is the bloodshed in a Quentin Tarantino movie is over-the-top make-believe, while the grotesquely bloody scene in the Jodi Arias case is all too real.

The high-stakes battle in court Thursday was over which weapons Arias used, and exactly when she used them to kill her onetime boyfriend Travis Alexander.

Jodi Arias kept her head down for over a half-hour, averting her eyes, as a Mesa Police forensic scientist picked her way through the trail of blood inside Travis Alexander's Mesa home.

This was where Arias says she killed him June 4, 2008.

Pointing to a blood-spattered sink, the prosecutor asked: why are some drips different from others?

"The blood droplets do not break into same sizes, so some are larger and when they hit that, they have more weight or volume so when they hit they drip down from the gravity," testified Lisa Perry, Mesa Police forensic scientist.

The prosecutor inquired about a bullet casing found in a pool of blood.

"In relation to the blood, when was that casing placed there in relation to the blood?" asked the prosecutor.

Perry: "After the blood was deposited there."

"So the blood source was already bleeding?"

"Yes," said Perry.

Prosecutors say this proves first Arias stabbed and sliced Alexander, then she shot him, bolstering their argument she's a cold blooded killer who deserves to be executed.

But Jodi Arias' attorneys say it's the other way around. First she shot Alexander in self-defense, then in a frenzy of fear knifed him.

On cross examination of a Mesa Police detective Thursday afternoon, Arias' attorneys got him to admit that, in a hearing before the trial, he had testified he believed Alexander was shot before he was stabbed and that the county medical examiner agreed with him.

The medical examiner responded he had no way of knowing the sequence of injuries.

The trial continues next week.

 

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