Not Everyone A Fan Of Football Team's Name Change - New York News

Not Everyone A Fan Of Football Team's Name Change

Posted: Updated:
UPPER MERION, Pa. -

A Montgomery County football team that's had the same name for decades recently got a makeover, but not everyone is excited by the changes.

The King of Prussia Indians, founded by Mary and Dave Vanicelli, were established in 1956. Even after they died, their daughter, Sandy Newstein, set up a foundation to help children who can't afford to play participate in their name.

Newstein tells FOX 29's Lauren Cohn she was disappointed to learn the organization is now known as the "Upper Merion Viking Youth Football Association."

Newstein says she's sure her parents would have shared in her disappointment.

Board president George Nikolaou says the decision wasn't an easy one. He too was an indian in his youth and appreciates the history, but says the 15-member new board voted unanimously in support of the new name.

Since the vote, Nikolaou says he's received overwhelming support.

"We talked about the concerns, we polled our constituents, we have 300 members from last year, an email went out and approximately 4 percent were opposed," Nikolaou said.

The new name is meant to mirror what other teams are doing in the area under Pop Warner, which took over the league two years ago, Nikolaou said.

"We can establish pride in these kids at a young age; that they're a little viking, viking in middle school, viking in high school throughout the entire area, not just King of Prussia.

But with new names comes a new restriction.

To play, a child must live in the Upper Merion School District area.

You can watch the story in the video above.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:48 PM EDT2014-04-18 02:48:47 GMT
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
  • Wineries flourish in Brooklyn

    Wineries flourish in Brooklyn

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:34 PM EDT2014-04-18 02:34:04 GMT
    Hundreds of oak barrels of wine are all stacked in one room. You might think this is Napa, California. But it's not. It's the Brooklyn Winery, located in what was once an old pickle factory in Williamsburg. Refrigerated grapes are brought in from the North Fork of Long Island and from the Finger Lakes and then aged in barrels. These days urban wineries are becoming more popular, and they're popping up all over the borough.
    Hundreds of oak barrels of wine are all stacked in one room. You might think this is Napa, California. But it's not. It's the Brooklyn Winery, located in what was once an old pickle factory in Williamsburg. Refrigerated grapes are brought in from the North Fork of Long Island and from the Finger Lakes and then aged in barrels. These days urban wineries are becoming more popular, and they're popping up all over the borough.
  • NYC to overhaul Superstorm Sandy rebuilding program

    NYC to overhaul Superstorm Sandy rebuilding program

    Thursday, April 17 2014 9:30 PM EDT2014-04-18 01:30:41 GMT
    Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled a sweeping report Thursday that examined New York City's recovery progress from Superstorm Sandy and promised to reform a much-maligned program that was supposed to rebuild wrecked homes. Speaking to about 50 homeowners, officials and community leaders in a storm-battered Staten Island neighborhood, the mayor said the city is aiming to start rebuilding an ambitious 500 homes through its federally funded Build-It-Back program.
    Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled a sweeping report Thursday that examined New York City's recovery progress from Superstorm Sandy and promised to reform a much-maligned program that was supposed to rebuild wrecked homes. Speaking to about 50 homeowners, officials and community leaders in a storm-battered Staten Island neighborhood, the mayor said the city is aiming to start rebuilding an ambitious 500 homes through its federally funded Build-It-Back program.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices