United Airlines bans shipping primates to laboratories - New York News

United Airlines bans shipping primates to laboratories

Posted: Updated:

Following a vigorous yearlong PETA campaign that included public protests and more than 100,000 e-mails and social-media messages, United Airlines told PETA Monday that it has banned the transport of primates to laboratories.

The new policy reads, "We do not book, accept or transport primates to or from medical research facilities."

Because Air Canada is in the process of implementing a similar ban, PETA's United victory means that not a single major airline based in North America will deliver monkeys to laboratories, where they are caged, poisoned, addicted to drugs, mutilated, and killed.

"It will be much harder for cruel experimenters to get their hands on monkeys to abuse now that United has joined every other commercial airline in North America in refusing to deliver primates to certain suffering and death in laboratories," says PETA Senior Vice President of Laboratory Investigations Kathy Guillermo. "PETA will continue to pressure the few overseas airlines—now numbering only four—that continue this inhumane practice."

PETA's United campaign began in 2011, when the airline—which had previously banned shipping primates for experiments—began to finalize its merger with Continental Airlines and adopted Continental's cargo policies, which allowed for the practice.

United received more than 130,000 protest e-mails from PETA supporters, and thousands of dedicated activists flooded United's Facebook wall with messages and photos of primates locked in laboratories. PETA demonstrated against the airline at its offices around the world, including its Chicago headquarters, and purchased stock in the company with the intention of introducing a shareholder resolution later this year.

Air France, China Eastern Airlines, Philippine Airlines, and Vietnam Airlines are the only remaining major airlines that transport primates destined for experiments.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • 8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    Friday, April 18 2014 8:26 AM EDT2014-04-18 12:26:31 GMT
    Officials are investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at New Jersey's Stevens Institute of Technology.The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine.
    The New Jersey Department of Health is investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at Stevens Institute of Technology.  The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine. Symptoms include swollen salivary glands, fever, headache, tiredness and loss of appetite.



  • Search for woman who tried to snatch baby in stroller

    NYPD: Woman tried to snatch baby in stroller

    Friday, April 18 2014 7:37 AM EDT2014-04-18 11:37:43 GMT
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
  • Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:48 PM EDT2014-04-18 02:48:47 GMT
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices