Body language expert weighs in on Arias trial - New York News

FOX 10'S STEVE KRAFFT TWEETS FROM THE ARIAS TRIAL

Body language expert weighs in on Arias trial

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PHOENIX -

It's the murder trial that's capturing national headlines: Jodi Arias is accused of killing her on-again off-again boyfriend.

Prosecutors say she shot Travis Alexander in the face while he was showering, stabbed him 27 times and slit his throat back in 2008.

Her lawyers say she did kill Alexander, but she was in an abusive relationship and it was in self-defense.

When you have a high profile case like this, there are cameras in the courtroom, focused on the defendant and there's been some discussion about how Arias is portraying herself.

Renate Mousseux is a body language expert who teaches businesspeople how to make a good impression.

She studied video of Jodi Arias in court and she finds Jodi's body language very revealing.

"Here Jodi is hiding her face and taking a deep breath. When you take a deep breath you get air into your sternum and make yourself bigger," says Mousseux.

What really jumped out at Mousseux? These images of Jodi Arias as the prosecutor spoke to the jury about the murder of her onetime boyfriend Travis Alexander.

"She pretends to cry and make herself cry, however I do not see any tears and that would be the first thing we see if somebody cries."

Mousseux says Arias frequently touches her hair -- she calls that a sign of nervousness. In general she sees a woman clearly adopting a defensive posture in the courtroom.

"Her hand on her face hiding from the jury, from other people supporting herself, closing her eyes like I don't want to see what is going on around me."

The Arias trial continues next Tuesday.

Jodi Arias could face the death penalty if convicted of first degree murder.

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