House owners 'used' by insurance company - New York News

Home owners 'used' by insurance company

Posted: Updated:
What remains of the Traina family home in New Dorp, Staten Island. What remains of the Traina family home in New Dorp, Staten Island.
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The owners of a house featured in an insurance company commercial touting their post-Sandy efforts to help customers say the agency didn't do enough to assist them.

The home owned by Sheila and Dominic Traina in New Dorp Beach, Staten Island was destroyed by the superstorm in late October.  A large pile of rubble is all that remains.

"The next morning I was in shock. It was terrible," said Dominic Traina after seeing the commerical.

The couple said Allstate Insurance Company offered them a payout of $10,000 for the damage which they turned down.

The owners did not have flood insurance. They said the insurance company claims most of their damage was caused by the storm surge, but they say much of the destruction was from fierce winds.

The amount is "inadequate" after decades making payments to Allstate, according to the couple.

"I don't want to even come down here anymore. I'm sick of looking at it," said Dominic Traina.

In response, Allstate issued the following statement:

"Allstate produced the commercial in accordance with all applicable advertising standards.

"Allstate's claims personnel have been on the ground since before Sandy made landfall to help customers with the claim process, we continue to work with customers affected by Sandy and seek to settle claims promptly and fairly, Allstate was typically the first company present in the most devastated areas following the storm, we deployed 24 mobile claim centers and catastrophe response vehicles in order to assist customers with immediate claim needs, thousands of Allstaters, many of whom are on the ground in New York, remain dedicated to helping those affected by Sandy."

The couple says they'll likely take legal recourse against the company.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Aire Ancient Baths

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:29 PM EDT2014-07-30 02:29:51 GMT
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
  • NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 8:40 PM EDT2014-07-30 00:40:09 GMT
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
  • NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 6:40 PM EDT2014-07-29 22:40:57 GMT
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices