Some Penn State Grads Support Corbett's Decision To Sue NCAA - New York News

Some Penn State Grads Support Corbett's Decision To Sue NCAA

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What's the old saying about "the enemy of my enemy is my friend…?"

Lots of Penn State alums are angry with Gov. Tom Corbett for what they believe was his slow and under-resourced probe of now-convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky.

"We don't trust him right now, when it comes to this matter," says Philadelphia political analyst and PSU grad Jeff Jubelirer.

But folks we talked to Wednesday, seemed happy that Corbett has filed a lawsuit against the NCAA, in an effort to erase the sanctions it placed against Penn State last summer.

"I hope that we win, PSU alum Ruth Johnson told FOX 29s Bruce Gordon. "Because I thought that the sanctions were- it was too much. The kids were really penalized."

The NCAA sanctions against Penn State include a $60 million fine, loss of 10 scholarships per year for four years, and a four year ban on bowl game appearances.

Some believe Jerry Sandusky would have been off the streets earlier, his list of victims shorter and penalties against PSU less severe, had then-attorney general Corbett acted more quickly and decisively in his probe of the former PSU defensive coordinator.

But on PSU's Brandywine campus, we found alums, parents and students who seem to support any effort to reduce or rescind the penalties.

"I know kids that are in high school now that wanted to come here for football," said PSU freshman Jalyn Johnson. "But they're not coming anymore because of all the penalties."

Sophomore Vinay Nayak said "I felt they were definitely too harsh, by the NCAA. I felt just the fine would have been enough- not hurting the university in general by damaging the football program over the next four years."

And Stephen Brackonnier, the father of a PSU senior told Gordon, "I just think that the penalties are affecting a lot of innocent people. It's affecting the future of people who may have come here who might not."

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