Gilbert student chosen for prestigious post of Senate page - New York News

Gilbert student chosen for prestigious post of Senate page

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GILBERT, Ariz. -

There are 100 U.S. Senators. It's a unique job, one that few will ever hold in their lives, but turns out there are even fewer Senate pages -- just 30.

An Arizona student just got accepted to serve in that role. She will be a Senate page for Majority Leader Harry Reid.

Thursday, we caught up with this amazing student at Higley High.

The Quinlan family is familiar with Washington, D.C. and the corridors of power. Their son Riley spent time as a page in Congress, and now younger daughter Keeley will do the same in the Senate.

Her acceptance letter was signed by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. It's being saved, along with mementos of Keeley's other accomplishments.

"I'm hoping to gain exposure since I'll be around prominent leaders and I'll get to see history happen, and just to experience a lot," she says.

The 30 pages will have a lot of busy work to do, and they will meet some of the most powerful people in the country.

"We carry legislation and bills. We deliver them and we carry messages and we answer phones and we prepare the Senate chamber as well," says Keeley.

"Every child in the United States has this opportunity. I think the exposure that they gain and learning to work with others that may be completely different from who you are, just makes you a more well-rounded individual," says mom Wendy Quinlan.

Keeley's brother was the reason she applied to be a Senate page. He knows his little sis will do well.

"It's very real world. You have to live on your own. Do your own laundry, set your own bedtime. You do school pretty much for your own. It's all on your own," says Riley Quinlan.

She's been to Washington before -- now she's ready to go to do some work there.

Keeley will leave the Arizona sunshine after the New Year and spend 5 months working in D.C. She's excited.

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