Paulsboro Bridge Deemed Safe, Reopened To Rail Service - New York News

Paulsboro Bridge Deemed Safe, Reopened To Rail Service

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A rail car is lifted by a large crane in Paulsboro last week. A rail car is lifted by a large crane in Paulsboro last week.
PAULSBORO, N.J. -

The bridge in Paulsboro where a train derailed and leaked vinyl chloride was reopened to rail service and a train curfew was lifted.

According to the Unified Command, the Federal Railroad Administration inspected the track and the bridge locking mechanism Sunday and determined the bridge to be safe for rail service to resume.

Over the weekend, three cars were transferred from barges, re-railed and transported away from the site, the Unified Command said in a Monday statement.

"I am truly thankful for the efforts of the nearly 250 professionals who contributed their expertise, commitment and hard work to his operation," Capt. Kathy Moore of the Coast Guard said in a statement.

"They have worked around the clock since Nov. 30 to help ensure the safety of Paulsboro residents and get these rail cars out of the water."

The Friday, November 30th derailment forced the evacuation of hundreds of area families and forced area schools in Paulsboro to close as crews worked to remove the derailed cars.

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