Jury selections slated for Mesa boyfriend slaying - New York News

Jury selections slated for Mesa boyfriend slaying

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PHOENIX -

Jury selection began Monday in the murder trial of a Mesa woman accused of brutally murdering her ex-boyfriend.

Police say Jodi Arias shot, stabbed, and slit the throat of motivational speaker Travis Alexander.

Monday, both sides started the process of whittling down a very large pool of potential jurors.

Today we heard from all sorts of people, including a makeup artist, a mortgage company owner, and a single mom who could potentially decide the fate of Jodi Arias.

It's a case that made national headlines. Jodi Arias is now 31 years old. She's accused of stabbing her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander 27 times -- shooting him in the face -- and slitting his throat.

His body was found inside his east Mesa home back in June of 2008.

We interviewed Arias from behind bars that year. In a soft-spoken voice, she told us she's innocent.

"I've done many things that are shameful but this is not one of them. I would be shaking in my boots right now if I had to answer to God for such a heinous crime," Arias said four years ago.

Prosecutors say they have some very strong evidence in the case against her, including a digital camera card containing intimate photographs of the couple taken before the murder. One on a bed, another in the shower.

Minutes later, on the same card, there are bloody pictures of the 30-year-old after he had been killed.

Police also found a bloody palm print matching both Arias' and Alexander's DNA.

His friends had always suspected Arias was responsible for his death. They say she was obsessed with him.

"I didn't commit murder, I didn't hurt Travis, I would never hurt Travis," Arias said.

If convicted Arias could get the death penalty.

Jury selection is expected to last for 2 weeks. The trial is scheduled to begin January 2.

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