A look inside the Amazon Fulfillment Center - New York News

A look inside the Amazon Fulfillment Center

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PHOENIX -

Millions of people hit the malls this weekend, but online shopping Monday was expected to break records.

Cyber Monday isn't just marketing hype anymore, and arguably, nowhere is busier than the workers at Amazon's massive fulfillment center in Phoenix.

We got a rare look inside.

There are 4 Amazon fulfillment centers in Arizona but the one at 51st Avenue and Buckeye is the company's largest.

They've hired extra help and workers are packing and shipping items 24/7.

Amazon sold 17 million items on Cyber Monday last year. That breaks down to more than 200 per second. But that's in the past.

"We expect today to be big, busy and we expect this season to be our busiest ever," says Craig Berman, Amazon.com.

The 1.2 million square foot center seems never-ending. But underneath the maze of conveyor belts and rows of merchandise is a meticulously organized operation.

When an order comes in, a worker grabs it off the shelves and sends it to another worker responsible for packing it.

The prepared order heads down a conveyor belt and is boxed up by machine.

Then, it's off to shipping, where the boxes are sorted by computer and loaded onto a truck. Workers use every available spot. The entire process takes a few hours.

"We'll be hiring 50,000 seasonal workers across the U.S. to meet customer demand and in this building we will have 2,000 employees," says Berman. "Working 24 hours to get customer orders onto the doorstep."

As of midday Monday, IBM said online sales were up 26 percent compared to last year. Up until recently, Amazon's busiest days were the ones leading up to Christmas -- but now today tops them all.

"Cyber Monday is real. It rivals Black Friday as a busy day and we really look at the entire week starting last Monday through this Cyber Monday as one of the biggest weeks of the year."

Amazon brought in police officers to help control traffic.

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