Council meeting on illegal tire dumping gets heated - New York News

Council meeting on illegal tire dumping gets heated

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ATLANTA -

Some angry Atlanta residents told local lawmakers on Monday that they're tired of being dumped on.  They told city leaders they don't want old tires discarded in their neighborhoods.

Atlanta City Councilwoman Joyce Sheperd held the meeting to discuss proposed legislation aimed at cracking down on illegal tire dumping.  Sheperd says illegal dumping of tires is perpetrated by carriers hauling used tires from tire sellers to "end users," who are supposed to burn them or otherwise get rid of them. She says they've come up with a multi-pronged approach.

Things got so heated at Monday's meeting that Sheperd threatened to cut off public comment.  

The city council is dusting off a six-month old proposal, and is now ready to vote on a law to cut down tens of thousands of tires left in vacant lots, on the street, and according to residents almost everywhere--- except in wealthy communities.  

But regardless of where you live in the city, all Atlantans are affected by the problem.  You see, the City of Atlanta pays for the disposal of these tires-- at a cost of $7.00 a piece.  But, the market rate is no more than $2.00 when a private company does it.  The proposed law would cut down on the number of scrap tires an operator can have.  Currently, that number is a maximum of 3,000 tires, but the new law would cut that number to 500 tires.  All tires must be taken to an approved environmental disposal site, and according to Sheperd, they would require operators to put identification marks on the tires in their inventory.  That way, if the tires were dumped, they would be able to be tracked.  

If the new law passes, Atlanta police would be left to impose fines, which if unpaid could lead to jail time.  The first formal vote on the issue comes Tuesday.

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