Website helps consumers with complaints - New York News

Website helps consumers with complaints

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PHOENIX -

Have you ever had a complaint about something and were on hold forever, waiting to talk to a representative?

Website Gripevine.com claims to get your problem resolved and deal with all your gripes

They hear it up the gripe-vine: complaint after complaint, except instead of the familiar run around and "will you please hold", Gripevine prides itself on action.

"We're all about resolutions. So we bring companies and consumers together in a fair and open playing field," said Dave Carrol, Gripevine co-creator.

Carol continued, "Solving problems, saving time, taking the pain out of complaining for consumers and the pain of complaints for companies."

You're dissatisfied with a service? A stress-free way to solve the problem using Gripevine starts with communication.

"We help them find the company first of all, because part of the problem is that sometimes you don't know the 1 800 number or how to reach them. So we make it easy for people to connect with companies. We give them unlimited bandwidth to see what the problem was," said Carrol.

"Compared with Twitter, where you only have 140 characters to say what happened," said Carrol. "And you can even upload video if you want to get creative."

Unlimited bandwidth means you can complain as much as you need to.

"When you're done explaining what happened you click "plant your gripe" then we take it and we send it to the company in question," said Carrol.

As a consumer, you get peace of mind. As a company, you get maximum feedback and a chance to fix the problem without all the negative press.

"The company gets notified - somebody has a problem with your company, and the company gets notified. It gives them an opportunity to reach out off line to solve a problem before it gains traction," said Carrol.

The service is absolutely free for complainers, or consumers, and it allows you to browse other people's gripes so you can compare and contrast their problem and results to your own situation.

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