Renewed efforts to find missing Morenci boys, 2 years later - New York News

Renewed efforts to find missing Morenci boys, 2 years later

Posted: Updated:
Age enhanced photos from the Center for Missing and Exploited Children Age enhanced photos from the Center for Missing and Exploited Children
MORENCI, Mich. (WJBK) -

The Morenci boys, Andrew, Alexander and Tanner Skelton, have been missing for nearly two years. They disappeared Thanksgiving Day, 2010. Now family and friends are renewing efforts to find them.

Click on the video player to watch Ronnie Dahl's report.

Tanya Zuvers is hoping new age progression pictures may lead her to her missing sons. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children created the photos of what they may look like now, 2 years after their disappearance. Alexander would be 9, big brother Andrew, 10 and the youngest, Tanner, 7. We talked to their mother by phone; she believes they're still alive.

"In my heart, I don't feel like they're gone," Zuvers told Fox 2. "I still feel they are very much alive. It's just going to take the right person in the right place at the right time and we'll get them home."

Tanya's nightmare began Thanksgiving, 2010. The boys went to stay with their father, John Skelton, at his home in Morenci for the holiday. Instead of returning them the next day, John says he gave them to a "group" because he feared they were being abused. His story never added up. Fearing the worst, volunteers braved bitter winds to search for the brothers. Despite their efforts, the children were never found.

John Skelton is currently serving time for their disappearance. Authorities now consider the case a murder investigation. But, their mom is not ready to give up hope. She and others continue to pass out flyers at truck stops and rest areas. She wakes up each day on a mission, to make sure her sons are not forgotten.

On the anniversary of their disappearance, an event is being planned at Wakefield Park to honor the boys.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices