Disaster Recovery Center Opens In Camden County - New York News

Disaster Recovery Center Opens In Camden County

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The Camden County Office of Emergency Management has teamed up with FEMA to open a Disaster Relief Recovery Center in Lindenwold, NJ.

The center is located at the Camden County Public Works complex at 2311 Little Egg Harbor Road.  It is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. seven days a week.

FEMA staff will be on site to assist anyone who needs help recovering from Hurricane Sandy in the following areas:

1. Rental payments for temporary housing can be made to families whose homes are unlivable.  Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners, and at least one month for renters.  Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements.

2. Grants are available for home repairs and replacement of essential household items that are not covered by insurance.   These grants to replace personal property cover improvements that make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary, and functional.  They also can be applied to help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related expenses not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs.

3.Unemployment payments of up to 26 weeks can be available to employees who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for other state benefits, including self-employed individuals.

 

Camden County residents seeking assistance from FEMA can apply several ways:

1. By phone:  (800) 621-3362   TTY:  (800) 462-7585

2. On the web:  www.disasterassistance.gov/

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