New York City public schools closed Monday - New York News

Zone A evacuation ordered

NYC public schools closed; Zone A evacuated

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New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that public schools will remain closed on Tuesday because of Hurricane Sandy.

At a Monday morning news conference he said, "This is a massive storm; hurricane force winds extend some 175 miles in every direction from its center."

He emphasized that the greatest danger posed by Sandy is the coastal storm surge it will produce.

Bloomberg reported that there was already flooding in the Battery, in the Rockaways, and on the FDR Drive.

The mayor had ordered a mandatory evacuation order for Zone A areas of New York City on Sunday.

At Monday's News conference he said that if people were still in Zone A and could find a way to leave, they should leave immediately.

Leaving might be tough since all public transportation had been suspended citywide since Sunday night.

EVACUATION INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION ORDER: The mayor may order residents of specified zones or communities to leave their homes for the protection of their health and welfare in the event of an approaching storm.

Click to find out information about New York City's evacuation zones, including how to find your zone on a map (PDF) or with the interactive zone finder . Also, download OEM's hurricane guide .

HOW TO EVACUATE

Since flooding and high winds can occur many hours before a hurricane makes landfall, it is critical evacuees leave their homes immediately if instructed to do so by emergency officials. Evacuees are encouraged to seek shelter with friends or family or outside evacuation zones when possible.

To avoid being trapped by flooded roads, washed-out bridges or disruptions to mass transportation, evacuees should plan their mode of transportation with special care.

Plan to use mass transit as much as possible, as it offers the fastest way to reach your destination. Using mass transit reduces the volume of evacuees on the roadways, reducing the risk of dangerous and time-consuming traffic delays.

Listen carefully to your local news media, which will broadcast reports about weather and transportation conditions.

Evacuations from at-risk zones will be phased to encourage residents in coastal areas to leave their homes before inland residents and to help ensure an orderly evacuation process.

Leave early. Evacuations will need to be completed before winds and flooding become a threat, because wind and heavy rain could force the early closure of key transportation routes, like bridges and tunnels.

The City advises against car travel during an evacuation. The City will be working hard to keep roads clear, but traffic is unavoidable in any evacuation. Driving will increase your risk of becoming stranded on a roadway during an evacuation.

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