Christie begins preparations for possible NJ TRANSIT shutdown - New York News

Possible NJ TRANSIT shutdown

Posted: Updated:
MYFOXNY.COM -

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's administration announced that preparations have begun for the potential shutdown of NJ TRANSIT bus, rail, light rail and Access Link service, effective Monday. 

Officials said this preliminary step is being implemented as the statewide transportation agency continues preparations for Hurricane Sandy.  

"The safety of our customers, employees and the public-at-large is paramount," said NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman and New Jersey Department of Transportation Commissioner James Simpson. "By beginning this important process, NJ TRANSIT will be better able to support the state's response to Hurricane Sandy by freeing up buses or other resources that may be needed for hurricane relief." 

Gov. Christie's administration issued the same full-scale shutdown of the NJ TRANSIT during Hurricane Irene in August of 2011 for nearly 36 hours. Officials said that decision last year is credited with saving billions in NJ TRANSIT assets and enabled NJ TRANSIT to restart service with all equipment available for use. There was also no customer or employee injuries were reported during this time.  

The systematic shutdown of NJ TRANSIT service will require a minimum of 12 hours to complete. The process requires the relocation and securing of buses, rail equipment and other NJ TRANSIT assets away from flood-prone areas. It also requires complete coordination with state and local officials throughout the process.  

The administration said this action is a precautionary measure and that no final decisions have been made regarding any potential future service suspension.  

Saturday afternoon Gov. Christie announced system-wide cross-honoring of all rail, bus and light rail tickets starting Monday, 12:00 a.m. and continuing through Wednesday, 6 a.m. This allows customers holding NJ TRANSIT tickets to use alternate means of transportation to get to their final destination, such as PATH, PATCO and private bus carriers. Due to the duration of the storm and the potential impact to the NJ TRANSIT system, this timeframe could be extended if necessary. 

NJ TRANSIT PREPARATIONS FOR HURRICANE SANDY

Rail and Light Rail Operations 

  • NJ TRANSIT's maintenance forces continue inspecting culverts, drainage pipes and rights-of-way to ensure they are clear of blockages that could exacerbate flooding and disrupt service.  
  • NJ TRANSIT rail and light rail crews and equipment are on standby to respond to downed trees, wires and flooding.

 Bus and Access Link Operations

  • NJ TRANSIT Bus and Access Link maintenance and support staff will be on standby 24/7 to respond where needed.

 Customer Service

  • Customer Service Field Offices will extend their hours of operations if necessary.
  • The Transit Information Office (TIC) - NJ TRANSIT's call center, is also prepared to extend its hours if necessary.

TRAVEL ADVICE

For the latest travel information, customers should listen to broadcast traffic reports, visit njtransit.com or access our Twitter feed at @NJ_TRANSIT prior to starting your trip. In the event of service delays or adjustments, including the suspension of service, NJ TRANSIT will provide the most current service information via the My Transit alert system, which delivers travel advisories for your specific trip to your cell phone, PDA or pager. Service information is also available by calling (973) 275-5555.

  • Listen closely to public address announcements at stations for late-breaking service information.
  • Build additional travel time into your trip to a station, terminal or bus stop.
  • Stairs, floors and platforms can be slippery, so please use caution when walking along wet surfaces or any outdoor surface exposed to the weather. Use extra care when boarding or exiting buses and trains.
  • Report slippery or unsafe conditions to bus operators, train crews or to NJ TRANSIT staff.
  • New Jersey NewsNew Jersey NewsMore>>

  • Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:03 AM EDT2014-07-29 14:03:41 GMT
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train that became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday has been removed. 1,000 passengers were on board when the Northeast Corridor train became stuck, according to NJ Transit officials. A rescue train was attached to the disabled train and removed to Penn Station about an hour behind schedule. It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. There are residual delays on NJT trains into and out of Penn Station.
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train that became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday has been removed. 1,000 passengers were on board when the Northeast Corridor train became stuck, according to NJ Transit officials. A rescue train was attached to the disabled train and removed to Penn Station about an hour behind schedule. It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. There are residual delays on NJT trains into and out of Penn Station.
  • Wildlife volunteer pleads in deaths of 300 animals

    Wildlife volunteer pleads in deaths of 300 animals

    A longtime volunteer with a local animal protection organization in New Jersey has pleaded guilty to animal cruelty charges. Authorities say they found more than 300 dead birds and animals in the Little Silver home of the volunteer, 56-year-old Gretchen Rell.
    A longtime volunteer with a local animal protection organization in New Jersey has pleaded guilty to animal cruelty charges. Authorities say they found more than 300 dead birds and animals in the Little Silver home of the volunteer, 56-year-old Gretchen Rell.
  • Newark, Jersey City, Paterson

    3 New Jersey mayors announce joint anti-crime plan

    3 New Jersey mayors announce joint anti-crime plan

    Monday, July 28 2014 6:28 PM EDT2014-07-28 22:28:17 GMT

    The mayors of New Jersey's three largest urban areas said Monday they are looking at inter-city collaboration as a way to stem the flow of bloodshed on their streets. Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop and Paterson Mayor Jose Torres spoke mainly in generalities about the partnership, but said specifics would be hammered out at a mayors' roundtable that will convene in September.

    The mayors of New Jersey's three largest urban areas said Monday they are looking at inter-city collaboration as a way to stem the flow of bloodshed on their streets. Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop and Paterson Mayor Jose Torres spoke mainly in generalities about the partnership, but said specifics would be hammered out at a mayors' roundtable that will convene in September.


  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Pregnant woman says officer put her in choke hold

    Pregnant woman says officer put her in choke hold

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 11:04 AM EDT2014-07-29 15:04:28 GMT
    A Brooklyn woman who is seven months pregnant released photos that she said show an NYPD officer putting her in a choke hold as she was being arrested for grilling on the sidewalk outside her home.  Rosean Miller was arrested for disorderly conduct on Saturday and her husband Moses was arrested for obstructing government business, a criminal charge. It's the latest in a string of reported choke holds by police officers. The move is not allowed under NYPD policy. 
    A Brooklyn woman who is seven months pregnant released photos that she said show an NYPD officer putting her in a choke hold as she was being arrested for grilling on the sidewalk outside her home.  Rosean Miller was arrested for disorderly conduct on Saturday and her husband Moses was arrested for obstructing government business, a criminal charge. It's the latest in a string of reported choke holds by police officers. The move is not allowed under NYPD policy. 
  • Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:03 AM EDT2014-07-29 14:03:41 GMT
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train that became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday has been removed. 1,000 passengers were on board when the Northeast Corridor train became stuck, according to NJ Transit officials. A rescue train was attached to the disabled train and removed to Penn Station about an hour behind schedule. It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. There are residual delays on NJT trains into and out of Penn Station.
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train that became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday has been removed. 1,000 passengers were on board when the Northeast Corridor train became stuck, according to NJ Transit officials. A rescue train was attached to the disabled train and removed to Penn Station about an hour behind schedule. It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. There are residual delays on NJT trains into and out of Penn Station.
  • The Big Idea

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 9:22 AM EDT2014-07-29 13:22:47 GMT
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices