Blood spinning: A quicker way to recover from injuries - New York News

Blood spinning: A quicker way to recover from injuries

Posted: Updated:
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -

Blood spinning is a treatment that's been available to the world's top athletes to treat injuries for years, helping them recover faster. But now, the rest of us are able to benefit from some of those gains.

What do Kobe Bryant, Hines Ward, and Tiger Woods have in common? They've all been helped by blood spinning.

A healing technique called PRP, protein rich plasma, was once only available to elite athletes. Now weekend warriors are enjoying the benefits.

I recently used it. My injury began as a searing pain in my right elbow.

"Your problem is you have a tendinopathy, here where you actually have some micro tearing of the muscle attachment to the bone," said Dr. Thomas Wall.

I hurt my elbow playing golf, but the injury is commonly known as tennis elbow. We used a cold laser to try to heal it in combination with physical therapy.

I spent the at least some part of ten weeks in this room trying to rehab this elbow naturally. I got better, but just not all the way there.

"we got to a point where it got better but you plateau'd, so we needed to get you over that hump and hopefully the PRP and cold laser will get you back to 100 percent," said physical therapist Reggie Vasquez.

So they drew my blood. One vial is all you need. It's placed into a centrifuge for a few minutes where it spins at high speed.

Once removed from the centrifuge, here's what you have.

The clear stuff on top is the platelet rich plasma, PRP. The good stuff. Injected into the injury, it will promote healing.

"We all have platelets floating around in our system and basically were going to utilize them by concentrating them 7 to 8 fold and put those platelets in the area where the problem is."

He numbs the area first. Numbed, Dr. Wall prepares to inject the PRP.

"There's about a teaspoon of fluid in here, and that's good stuff, that's excellent stuff. This is what contains all the growth factors."

He massages the PRP into the injured area.

"Four weeks you should start feeling beneficial effects and it should get better and better with time."

Within a month, I felt 80 percent better. Now I'm finally playing golf again -- but don't take my word for it.

Listen to the master, chief master and 8th degree black belt Bill Babin.

Five weeks before his test for 8th degree black belt in tae kwon do, disaster struck. A bad hamstring tear. He had waited 7 years for this moment.

Babin thought he was finished. But Dr. Wall had other ideas -- blood spinning.

"I had no idea what it was and I'd never heard of it… and I said dude I got five weeks I need it," said Babin.

Five weeks after blood spinning, Babin said, "I had gotten back to the point where I was kicking at 100 percent."

Passing a grueling test, he earned his 8th degree black belt. He credits blood spinning -- PRP -- for getting him through it.

"It's a very effective therapy and it worked on me. More people need to understand that there is more out there than is traditionally offered."

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • 8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    8 confirmed mumps cases at Stevens Institute of Technology

    Friday, April 18 2014 8:26 AM EDT2014-04-18 12:26:31 GMT
    Officials are investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at New Jersey's Stevens Institute of Technology.The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine.
    The New Jersey Department of Health is investigating eight confirmed cases of mumps found in students at Stevens Institute of Technology.  The college in Hoboken says the students range in age from 18 to 21. All were fully vaccinated with two documented doses of mumps-containing vaccine. Symptoms include swollen salivary glands, fever, headache, tiredness and loss of appetite.



  • Search for woman who tried to snatch baby in stroller

    NYPD: Woman tried to snatch baby in stroller

    Friday, April 18 2014 7:37 AM EDT2014-04-18 11:37:43 GMT
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.
  • Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Manhattan restaurant proactive on food allergens

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:48 PM EDT2014-04-18 02:48:47 GMT
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
    From the St. Louis spare to a rack of beef, ribs are the specialty for Chef Eddie Montalvo at Blue Smoke Restaurant in the Flat Iron District of Manhattan. While the ribs are smoked for flavor, they are cooked gluten- and nut-free. The restaurant pays special attention to food allergies. Sloan Miller, president of Allergic Girl Resources, says 15 million Americans have a diagnosed food allergy. Eight foods typically set off reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, dairy, egg, an...
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices