MaterialWrld.com online fashion community - New York News

Online fashion community allows you to sell your closet's contents

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MYFOXNY.COM -

Eco fashion blogger and stylist Greta Eagan is excited about her closet.

"These are all my scarves, I love scarves," she says, showing off items in the closet. "I love this dress too, it's so pretty. … Then I have fun accessories, headbands with bows."

Now she's sharing them with the world. 

"These sneakers are something that I favorited, but I might sell them soon," she says, holding up a pair.

Items from Eagan's closet along with those of 100 other style-makers are up for sale on MaterialWrld.com, a site launched in September by Harvard Business School buddies Jie Zheng and Rie Yano. 

"We are a mix of content and commerce," Zheng says. "People could engage in beautiful aspirational images of other people's favorite items, but also have the opportunity to purchase it."

It's a simple concept: users post pictures of their most precious clothes and accessories, and then decide which ones they want to sell, if any. 

Other users can purchase those items with one simple click.  

The sellers determine their own price. Items range in price from $30 to $3,000.

Zheng and Yano say they started the site after having difficulty selling their own clothes.  

"Taking items to a consignment store and thrift store, really made us feel like it was a rip off, and we really never had to time to list the things on eBay or Craigslist," Zheng says.

Eagan, also an eBay user, says the site takes the guesswork out of selling clothes online.

"From my experience of selling and listing it, it's quick, it's easy and the other part is it resonates with my own style aesthetic and I feel like I'm with my peers and other people that I admire their style and what they're listing," Eagan says.

The collections are curated. Anyone can post their closets as long as the meet the brand standards and aesthetic of the site, which screams fashionista.

www.materialwrld.com

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