Crews stage dramatic rescue after hiker falls in Dawson Co. - New York News

Crews stage dramatic rescue after hiker falls in Dawson Co.

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DAWSON COUNTY, Ga. -

Crews rescued a hiker who fell more than a dozen feet in the north Georgia Mountains on Friday.

The 22-year-old man was with a group of four who were climbing Cochran Falls, which is located about four miles from Amicalola Falls. Around 2:30 p.m., the man fell about 20 to 30 feet and landed on rocks, according to Lt. Ryan Bramblett of Dawson County Emergency Services.

Another member of the group called 911.

Rescue crews from Dawson County Emergency Services teamed up with local fire departments and air support from the Department of Natural Services to rescue the rock climber.

Firefighters staged at Amicalola Falls State Park. They drove on a narrow mountainous dirt road more than two miles, then hiked another two and a half miles through rugged terrain with their gear.

"We were tired by the time we got there, you know,  to say the least," said Bramblett.

SkyFOX 5 showed the hiker being lifted by a helicopter from the site and taken to a safe transfer place, where he was then transported to Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH RAW FOOTAGE OF THE RESCUE!

"There was no I's in the group today. Twenty four people on scene all working together for the betterment of one injured individual," said Chief Lanier Swafford.

Swafford says the injured climber suffered several broken bones but was alert and talking.

"He was very appreciative of our efforts, very appreciative," said Swafford.

The injured climber's name has not been released. He is recovering at Grady Memorial Hospital.

The rescue crews said they often get calls in the woods, but it isn't every day that someone has to be airlifted to safety.

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