DPS releases dash cam videos to highlight car seat safety - New York News

DPS releases dash cam videos to highlight car seat safety

Posted: Updated:
COON RAPIDS, Minn. (KMSP) -

Until now, dash cam video from the city of Ramsey has been reserved for police training across the state. Now, the Department of Public Safety is publicly releasing footage with the hope that it will get parents' attention during National Child Passenger Safety Week.

The video shows a father pulled over on Highway 10 with his three little girls -- ages 10, 7 and 5 --sitting in the back of his flatbed truck. The girls are between two kayaks with a one-inch webbing tie down across their laps.

"It's one of those things where that was a extreme case, but we all have seen these things," said Heather Darby, DPS Car Seat Safety Expert.

This week marks National Child Passenger Safety Week. Child car seat check points are expected to be busy across the metro, including one in Coon Rapids. Parents lined up and were eager to correct their own child safety or booster seat mistakes.

"I didn't know there was an expiration on car seats," admitted Michelle Zylka, mother of two.

Darby says the most common mistake parents make is switching their children from rear-facing seats to front-facing seats too early. Ideally, children should be two years old or at least 20 pounds before that happens.

"We had to scratch what we thought and completely redo to make sure they are all safe," said Patty Jansen who has two kids and is expecting her third.

Another big mistake is moving students out of booster seats. Law requires children under 8 years old to be in a booster, but experts recommend anyone 4'9" or shorter should be in a booster seat.

Online resource:

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 10:05 PM EDT2014-09-17 02:05:20 GMT
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
  • Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 8:43 PM EDT2014-09-17 00:43:17 GMT
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
  • High-fiving strangers in NYC

    High-fiving strangers in NYC

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:01 PM EDT2014-09-16 22:01:29 GMT
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices