New Detroit FBI head talks about challenges ahead - New York News

New Detroit FBI head talks about challenges ahead

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Robert Foley is the new special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit Division  (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com) Robert Foley is the new special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit Division (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com)
SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (WJBK) -

There is a new man in charge of the FBI in Detroit.  Robert Foley has been named special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit Division, replacing Andrew Arena, who retired in May.

Foley recently sat down with Fox 2 to talk about some of the new challenges he'll face.

"I have a personal objective and mission to make sure that those who violate the public trust are held accountable for that violation."

Foley is new to Detroit and to Michigan, but not to crime fighting.  He has been with the FBI since 1996 after six years in the Army.  He comes here from Washington D.C. where he was special agent in charge of the Administrative Division.  Before that, he spent four years investigating public corruption, and for him here in Detroit that's job number one.

"Everybody's working hard to make it a better place and corrupt activity can stall that," Foley said.  "My objective is going to be to take that corrupt activity, move it aside so that the people of Michigan can progress forward and particular the folks in Detroit."

Foley said we have lots of other issues facing us here in Michigan such as gangs, violent crime and preventing counter terrorism.  He plans to work closely with other agencies like Detroit Police and Michigan State Police.  It's a big job, but this Boston native said he's up to the challenge.  Along with his wife and daughter, he said he is happy to be making his new home here in Detroit.

"I'm excited to be here.  I think there [are] a lot of opportunities both for my family, as well as for the direction I intend to steer the office, so great decision on my part and I'm happy to be here."

To see the complete interview with Robert Foley, click on the second video in the player above.

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