10 percent pay cuts for all Detroit workers start Wednesday - New York News

10 percent pay cuts for all Detroit workers start Wednesday

Posted: Updated:
Ken Whipple and other members of Detroit's Financial Advisory Board meet on Monday at Wayne State University.  (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com) Ken Whipple and other members of Detroit's Financial Advisory Board meet on Monday at Wayne State University. (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com)
DETROIT (WJBK) -

"We die.  The city lies.  No police.  No peace," said Scott Pellerito from the Detroit Police Officers Association.

Despite the repeated cries and even a drawn up "eviction notice", the state appointed Financial Advisory Board took residence for an hour and a half meeting on Wayne State's campus and moving ahead with decisions about how to clean up the city's financial mess.  The board's powers and decisions that stood before the suspension of Public Act 4 still stand, and so ten percent wage cuts for all city workers start this Wednesday.

"We're moving forward with the project manager.  We're moving forward with all the initiatives, imposing the contracts on the unions, and we're trying to save money," said Detroit Mayor Pro-tem Gary Brown.

The city plans to address the Financial Advisory Board when it comes to police issues.  That will be in October.  Then in November, they'll talk about fire needs, and then EMS in December, but are they moving at a quick enough pace.  We're in crisis mode many would argue.

"You'd like to do everything at once, but you just can't.  I think if we could show the citizens that together we can make some movement, we can turn some streetlights on, we can accelerate the houses coming down, we can make the place safer, I think that will go a long way," said Ken Whipple, who serves on the board.

Members of the board understand the anger, but say they are here for nothing more than leverage in a back and forth power grab between the city and the state.

"Whether it's the city using us as leverage to make some proposals of things that badly need to be done or soliciting some help from the state, whatever else it is, we're not a bunch of outsiders coming in to dictate to Detroit at all," Whipple said.

The next time the Financially Advisory Board will meet will be September 10 despite some of the protesters not wanting them to get together.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Belgian artist Baloji kicks off tour in New York

    Belgian artist Baloji kicks off tour in New York

    Thursday, April 17 2014 7:35 PM EDT2014-04-17 23:35:06 GMT
    To say the 6 feet 5 inch Baloji has a presence would be an understatement. The Belgian artist commands the stage with his mix of hip hop, funk, and rap. The 34-year-old rocked out Webster Hall back in January. Now he's back in New York City kicking off a month-long tour. "It's one of the most inspiring cities on Earth so it's always great to be here," Baloji says.
    To say the 6 feet 5 inch Baloji has a presence would be an understatement. The Belgian artist commands the stage with his mix of hip hop, funk, and rap. The 34-year-old rocked out Webster Hall back in January. Now he's back in New York City kicking off a month-long tour. "It's one of the most inspiring cities on Earth so it's always great to be here," Baloji says.
  • First look at electric carriage that may replace horse buggies

    First look at electric carriage that may replace horse buggies

    Thursday, April 17 2014 7:11 PM EDT2014-04-17 23:11:02 GMT
    New York has never known a Central Park without that rhythmic click-clacking. But if Mayor Bill de Blasio gets his way, he'll put those hooves out to pasture, replacing them with a different noise-maker. Actually, excluding its horn the electric carriage makes little noise at all. It runs on lithium-ion batteries, has a variable-speed a/c motor, and is relatively silent, says Jason Wenig.
    New York has never known a Central Park without that rhythmic click-clacking. But if Mayor Bill de Blasio gets his way, he'll put those hooves out to pasture, replacing them with a different noise-maker. Actually, excluding its horn the electric carriage makes little noise at all. It runs on lithium-ion batteries, has a variable-speed a/c motor, and is relatively silent, says Jason Wenig.
  • Ex-NBA player: Re-entry tougher than serving time

    Ex-NBA player: Re-entry tougher than serving time

    Thursday, April 17 2014 6:50 PM EDT2014-04-17 22:50:46 GMT
    Jayson WilliamsJayson Williams
    Former NBA player Jayson Williams says trying to re-enter society after serving time for shooting a limousine driver was more difficult than being in prison.
    Former NBA player Jayson Williams says trying to re-enter society after serving time for shooting a limousine driver was more difficult than being in prison.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices