CDC: Whooping cough cases may be most in 5 decades - New York News

CDC: Whooping cough cases may be most in 5 decades

Posted: Updated:

By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA (AP) - Health officials say the nation is on track to have the worst year for whooping cough in more than five decades.

Nearly 18,000 cases have been reported so far - more than twice the number seen at this point last year. At this pace, the number of whooping cough cases will surpass every year since 1959.

"There is a lot of this out there, and there may be more coming to a place near you," Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Wisconsin and Washington state each have reported more than 3,000 cases, and high numbers have been seen in a number of other states, including New York, Minnesota, Kansas and Arizona.

Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial disease. It leads to severe coughing that causes children to make a distinctive whooping sound as they gasp for breath. In rare cases it can be fatal, and nine children have died so far this year.

Children get vaccinated against whooping cough in five doses, with the first shot at age 2 months and the final one between 4 and 6 years. Then a booster is recommended around age 11. The vaccine's protection does wane and health officials have debated moving up the booster shot.

The CDC is urging adults and especially pregnant women to get vaccinated so they don't spread it to infants who are too young to get the vaccine.

Whooping cough used to cause hundreds of thousands of illnesses a year but cases fell after a vaccine was introduced in the 1940s. Starting in the late 1960s, fewer than 5,000 cases were reported annually in the United States, for a stretch of about 25 years. But the numbers started to rise in the 1990s.

Online: www.cdc.gov

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • LL Cool J stays true to hip hop roots

    LL Cool J stays true to hip hop roots

    Friday, August 1 2014 10:38 PM EDT2014-08-02 02:38:22 GMT
    EXCLUSIVE -- LL Cool J grew and evolved from a hip hop artist out of Hollis, Queens, to a Hollywood TV and movie star. But he always stayed true to hip hop culture. We'd see him backstage at concerts just hanging out with us, so when I heard he was back in New York for the summer I had to find out why. I tracked him down to a Midtown Manhattan recording studio for this exclusive interview.
    EXCLUSIVE -- LL Cool J grew and evolved from a hip hop artist out of Hollis, Queens, to a Hollywood TV and movie star. But he always stayed true to hip hop culture. We'd see him backstage at concerts just hanging out with us, so when I heard he was back in New York for the summer I had to find out why. I tracked him down to a Midtown Manhattan recording studio for this exclusive interview.
  • Friday Night Live: August 1, 2014

    Friday Night Live: August 1, 2014

    Friday, August 1 2014 10:28 PM EDT2014-08-02 02:28:04 GMT
    This is Fox 5's Friday Night Live, a weekly celebration of the end of the work week. All summer long, the Fox 5 team brings you the latest in entertainment, nightlife, food, and music in our area. In this jam-packed episode: an exclusive interview with superstar LL Cool J, a helicopter tour over New York City, dishing on celebrity relationships, and sexier breakfast with Chef Mark Bailey.
    This is Fox 5's Friday Night Live, a weekly celebration of the end of the work week. All summer long, the Fox 5 team brings you the latest in entertainment, nightlife, food, and music in our area. In this jam-packed episode: an exclusive interview with superstar LL Cool J, a helicopter tour over New York City, dishing on celebrity relationships, and sexier breakfast with Chef Mark Bailey.
  • Central Park underwear run

    Central Park underwear run

    Friday, August 1 2014 10:16 PM EDT2014-08-02 02:16:48 GMT
    Raw athleticism streaked through Central Park Friday evening bared for a modest body of spectators. Two-hundred triathletes ran a skimpy 1.7-mile loop in their underwear to flesh out the opening festivities of New York City Triathlon weekend.Midriffs and tan lines rippled in the open air and a not-so-tighty finish saw the first male and the first female finishers undress the course in record time.
    Raw athleticism streaked through Central Park Friday evening bared for a modest body of spectators. Two-hundred triathletes ran a skimpy 1.7-mile loop in their underwear to flesh out the opening festivities of New York City Triathlon weekend.Midriffs and tan lines rippled in the open air and a not-so-tighty finish saw the first male and the first female finishers undress the course in record time.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices