One More Thing: A rich life, little noticed - New York News

One More Thing: A rich life, little noticed

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

One More Thing about a story you don't normally see on TV. Someone who's not famous, quietly excels in his or her small field over a lifetime and then dies naturally at a ripe old age, doesn't usually make on the news.

That's why I like to read newspaper obituaries, where you can find great stories about fascinating people.

Today I read about Doctor Joseph B. Kirsner.

He was a University of Chicago gastro-enterologist for more than 60 years. He wrote almost 800 scientific papers and six editions of a massive textbook that weighs more than four pounds. He pioneered new treatments for colitis and Crohn's disease. After enlisting during World War Two, he became a decorated army doctor in Europe and the Pacific. Later in life, he even flew to Morocco to care for King Hassas, the Second and his family for more than 20 years.

Dr. Kirsner was married for 64 years. His wife, Minnie, died in 1998. But he decided not to retire at 65. In fact, he stopped seeing patients only seven years ago, when he was 95. The doctor would give his home number out to all patients.

They say his day did notend until everybody who had called him that day had been called back.

 On his 98th birthday, he gave a presentation about the history of the U of C's Medical Program.

 Dr Kirsner died at the age of 102.

I think his life was worth a minute on the news. Don't you?

 

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