Bing leaves before addressing Detroit City Council on Crittendon - New York News

Bing leaves before addressing Detroit City Council on Crittendon

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Detroit Mayor Dave Bing at a press conference where he talked about Friday's special session of the City Council.  (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com) Detroit Mayor Dave Bing at a press conference where he talked about Friday's special session of the City Council. (Credit: WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com)
DETROIT (WJBK) -

Mayor Dave Bing requested a special session before City Council.  His purpose, to ask them to relieve Krystal Crittendon from her duties as corporation counsel, but instead of being allowed to speak Friday, he was treated to a barrage of criticism from the public.
 
"Why pick on her when he has a whole cadre of highly paid incompetent appointees who can't get their jobs done?" said Gregg Murray.
 
"Is it only when it agrees with you that it's okay to follow the charter?" said Ms. Hampton.

Halfway through the comments, the mayor's people requested he be allowed to speak due to time constraints, but that request was rejected.
 
"The meeting starts with public comment, and so we're only halfway done," said City Council President Charles Pugh.
 
Then he himself interjected and said he had to leave.
 
"Mr. President, I have a conference call with D.C. that I'll have to go to shortly."
 
The meeting was recessed while he took his phone call, leaving an angry crowd to wait.

Earlier in the week Bing had asked Crittendon to resign because of her legal challenge to the consent agreement.  She declined and City Council has indicated they support her.

Late in the day, Bing called a press conference slamming City Council for a lack of respect.  He said he would send council his statement and move on.
 
"I think our council and its leadership must be more responsible and respectful to the Office of the Mayor and to the citizens of Detroit.  They have turned this into a sideshow and I will not participate."
 
"I think I should've been able to present my position as opposed to sitting there necessarily playing games with [people's] lives.  I don't have time for that.  There's too much work to be done in the city."
 
Pugh said the people need to be heard.

"I don't know why he's offended that he has to listen to the people of the City of Detroit.  These are his citizens."

Bing is saying that Crittendon can remain as corporation counsel representing City Council, but he will not have her represent him and that he will seek outside counsel as his representative.
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