Poco Fire grows to 11,011 acres - New York News

Poco Fire grows to 11,011 acres

Posted: Updated:
Courtesy: ASNF USFS Courtesy: ASNF USFS
YOUNG, Ariz. -

An Arizona wildfire has continued to grow and is 15 percent contained.

As of Thursday morning, the Poco Fire near Young now is estimated at 11,011 acres, up from 8,100 acres a day before.

Fire information spokeswoman Punky Moore says the electric lines have been re-energized after being turned off Wednesday.

Thursday, crews will be watching for spot fires, holding the existing fire lines and mopping-up. On the southwest side of the fire on Forest Road 857, firefighters will be extending and reinforcing fire lines by continuing burn-out operations.

Moore says steep terrain, aggressive fire behavior, high temperatures and dry vegetation will continue to hamper containment efforts.

More than 700 firefighters from 12 states, as well as four helicopters and other resources are battling the blaze.

Crews continue to hold and improve existing fire lines on the north, east and south sides of the fire.

The blaze has been contained from reaching two small communities about three miles away.

Poco Fire information: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2911

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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