Blaine man gets 10 years in friend's 2C-E overdose death - New York News

Blaine man gets 10 years in friend's 2C-E overdose death

Posted: Updated:
Pictured above is the synthetic drug known as 2C-E. Pictured above is the synthetic drug known as 2C-E.
BLAINE, Minn. (KMSP) -

After accepting a plea bargain to avoid federal charges, a 22-year-old Blaine man was sentenced Tuesday to nearly 10 years in prison for the providing the synthetic drugs that killed one of his friends.

Last March, Trevor Robinson died after taking a synthetic hallucinogen that sent 11 people to the hospital in what police described as a "mass overdose" during a party.

Timothy Lamere cooperated with authorities throughout the investigation and admitted to buying the designer drug known as 2C-E on the Internet. In court, he apologized to the victims, saying, "If I could go back and change it, I would."

Lamere was sentenced to 117 months in prison for third-degree unintentional murder, but Anoka County Attorney Tony Palumbo did not celebrate the sentence.

"There is no triumph for the criminal justice in this sentence, but only great sadness," he said. "One young man lost his life and his friend is going to prison."

Last month, Lamere accepted a plea bargain to avoid federal charges that could have doubled his prison time.

Palumbo continued, saying "Experimenting with dangerous drugs can lead to a result that no one intends. Unfortunately, the worst result happened here."

The victim's mother did not appear in court, saying it was too hard for her. She did give a statement to say she didn't want Lamere to go to prison, instead suggesting intensive drug treatment.

"Tim is not a criminal. He is a very young man that made bad choices," her statement read.

The judge explained he was not sentencing Lamere to prison because he is a bad person, saying it was simply because he committed a crime. He also told Lamere his life has meaning because he has an important story to tell that could save countless lives.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 10:05 PM EDT2014-09-17 02:05:20 GMT
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
  • Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 8:43 PM EDT2014-09-17 00:43:17 GMT
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
  • High-fiving strangers in NYC

    High-fiving strangers in NYC

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:01 PM EDT2014-09-16 22:01:29 GMT
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices