Chicago's Most Wanted - New York News

Chicago's Most Wanted

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 Chicago police and FBI agents say 27 year old Eric Secundino went to an apartment building in the 2400 block of North Monticello on New Year's Day 2008 to sell drugs. He met one of the tenants the night before at a party, but investigators say what went down was not a typical drug deal. They call it a drug rip off, instead. Thats because agents say when Secondino and his accomplice arrived at the apartment, they had no drugs with them. But as soon as they entered the unit, Secundino and the other man pulled out guns and demanded money. When the victims said they had none, the shooting started. The FBI's Ross Rice says, "It all happened very quickly. They probalbly weren't in the apartment more than a minute and half to two minutes. Five to six shots were fired in total."

Those shots killed Martha Ortega, Jose Soberainis and Jose Bravo and injured Pedro Cristobal. Then, Secundino and the other gunman took off. Investigators say the two were last seen getting into a vehicle that was waiting for them on the corner. Police records show they took off in either a red or maroon SUV .

Secundino is now charged with murder, but he's been on the run for more than two years.
He may be coming back to the Chicago area. Agents say he has friends and family in Chicago and in Romeoville. They also say his fellow Spanish Cobra gang members may be helping him hide.

Rice says, "There's been speculation he might have gone to Mexico. He might have gone to Arizona. No confirmed sightings and he remains at large."

Secundino is described as a hispanic male, about five feet nine inches tall, weighing around 185 pounds,
with black hair, brown eyes, and has a tattoo of the letter "S" on his upper right arm and a tatto of the letter "C" on his upper left arm. He is considered armed and dangerous. If you see him, call police.

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