Urban Outfitters' 'Eat Less' T-Shirt Controversy - New York News

Urban Outfitters' 'Eat Less' T-Shirt Controversy

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Urban Outfitters has yanked a controversial T-shirt off its website following Internet-fueled backlash from critics who complained that the V-neck encouraged eating disorders among young women.

The offending item is a gray V-neck with the phrase "Eat Less" scrawled across the front.

The shirt was modeled on the funky fashion purveyor's website by a rail-thin brunette model in a hiked-up miniskirt under the description: "Eat less or more or however much you'd like in this seriously soft knit tee cut long and topped with a v-neck."

The blogosphere has expressed outrage over the shirt, with one blogger calling it " tasteless" and alleging that it promoted an unhealthy dietary message.

Urban Outfitters is still apparently selling the shirt in its stores, according to New York Magazine.

Critics of the shirt may be more vocal than its defenders. A poll on the Huffington Post showed that readers were actually split 53.9 -46.1 percent in favor of the shirt.

This is not Urban Outfitters' first T-shirt controversy of the year.

Urban Outfitters, which is known for selling hip, kitschy merchandise, found itself in hot water when it was caught marketing a short-sleeved, buttoned shirt on its website as "Obama/Black." The retailer called the online description an "error" and apologized for "offending anyone."

Over the years Urban Outfitters' products have also been the subject of several controversies regarding religious and ethnic issues.

In 2003 African-American leaders blasted the company for releasing a Monopoly parody board game called Ghettopoly.

That same year Urban Outfitters drew the ire of the Anti-Defamation League when it began selling a T-shirt featuring the phrase "Everyone Loves a Jewish Girl" surrounded by dollar signs.

Urban Outfitters has not yet commented about the "Eat Less" controversy.

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